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What was Aaron Rodgers' alternative treatment that 'immunized' the QB?

Yasmine Leung November 4, 2021
Photo by Norm Hall/Getty Images

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The NFL reports covid-positive Aaron Rodgers was unvaccinated despite stating he was ‘immunized’ in August. Instead, he used an alternative treatment of homeopathic remedies to ‘raise his antibody levels’. So, what was Aaron Rodgers’ alternative treatment?

Aaron Rodgers will sit out Week 9’s game as the Packers go head to head with the Kansas City Chiefs. The NFL shared the news he tested positive for covid-19 on 3 November. Jordan Love will be his replacement.

Packers QB tests positive

According to NFL covid-19 protocol, the quarterback must undergo a ten-day isolation from his team. His earliest date of return will be 13 November, a day before the Chiefs’ game against the Seattle Seahawks.

When questioned about whether he was vaccinated in August 2021, he replied: “Yes, I’ve been immunized.”

However, NFL Network Insider Ian Rapoport reveals underwent an alternative treatment that ruled him as ‘unvaccinated’.

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What did the NFL say?

The 37-year-old reportedly received homeopathic treatment from his personal doctor to raise his antibody levels.

Since the treatment was unauthorised by the National Football League Players Association (NFLPA), he continued wearing masks, testing daily. He would have to isolate for five days if he came in contact with a positive case, despite being negative himself.

Rapoport claimed on the Pat McAfee Show the team knew about his unvaccinated status according to the NFL letter of the law.

“Rodgers did go through a homeopathic or holistic immunization treatment which he thought might be able to get him vaccinated status, but the NFL said it would not.”

What was Aaron Rodgers’ alternative treatment?

According to the National Center For Complementary And Intergrative Health (NCCIH), homeopathic treatment is based on the use of highly diluted substances. It follows the ‘law of minimum dose’ – the concept that the lower the dose, the greater its effectiveness.

Practioners claim the method causes the body to heal itself through the “like-cures-like” notion, the belief if a substance causes illness in a healthy person, small doses of the same substance can cure it.

It is dubbed an alternative treatment since it differs to conventional Western medicine. The NCCIH claims it uses plant-based ingredients, minerals or animals to create the remedy.

Homeopathic treatments usually come in the form of sugar pellets absorbed under the tongue or as a gel, cream or ointment.

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The definition of immunization and vaccination

According to the CDC, vaccination is the act of using a vaccine to produce immunity to a specific disease. Immunization is the process by which a person becomes protected against a disease through vaccination. Both terms are used interchangeably.

There has been debate over Rodgers’ use of the terms immunized and vaccinated. Dr Gregory DeMuri, a UW infection disease specialist, states:

“The terms don’t make sense medically to a medical practitioner. Immunized and vaccinated mean the same thing.”

However, Curry Chaudoir, director of Acupuncture And Holistic Health Associates, defended the quarterback:

“That probably meant he built his immune system up. I don’t think he was lying. He was just saying: ‘Listen, I got my body so it can fight.’ I think he’s a natural-minded person.

“It was probably some remedy that triggered the immune system response that would put the body in a better state.”

Doctors warn against homeopathy treatment

Dr DeMuri maintains there are “no special herbs or potions proposed for covid”.

University of Kansas infectious disease specialist Dr Dana Hawkinson agrees: “When you look at treatments [natural substances] against infections or illness they really haven’t shown or proven to be beneficial.”

He maintains the only proven effective medicines are “the three vaccines”.

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Yasmine is a third-year Anthropology and Media student at Goldsmiths University with a new obsession with League of Legends, despite being really bad. She's always on social media keeping on top of the latest news and trends and is HITC’s expert in Korean pop culture. She also loves music, TV and fashion - her favourite things to write about.