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Here's why so many tennis players live in Monaco and Monte Carlo

Joshua Rogers January 28, 2022
who do so many tennis players live in monaco and monte carlo
Photo by Dan Istitene/Getty Images

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After the 2022 Australian Open semifinal between Daniil Medvedev and Stefanos Tsitsipas, fans wanted to know why so many tennis players live in Monaco and Monte Carlo.

The glitz and glamour of Monte Carlo has attracted the rich and famous for decades. During the 2022 Australian Open semifinal recently, fans wanted to know why tennis players in particular choose to live in Monaco.

Both Daniil Medvedev and Stefanos Tsitsipas live in Monte Carlo. There’s also a number of other high profile players who reside there. Here’s a few reasons why.

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Firstly, the obvious…

A huge reason why so many tennis players live in Monaco is because it’s so beautiful! The Principality has been the playground of millionaires for decades. Monaco is surrounded by expensive shops, glamorous casinos, a stunning harbour, and breathtaking natural beauty.

Not only is the weather amazing (Monte Carlo gets over 300 sunny days a year!), Monaco is also located right on the Mediterranean, which means it has incredible access to Spain, France, Italy, and many other places. The small yet spectacular Principality is undoubtedly one of the most beautiful places in Europe – who wouldn’t want to live there?!

Living in Monaco comes with huge financial incentives

Not only is it beautiful, Monaco also comes with a huge financial upside.

According to MyTennisHQ: The reason why tennis players live in Monte Carlo is that it is considered a tax haven. The Principality of Monaco does not collect personal income taxes and does not levy net wealth taxes. The highest-ranked players in the world earn millions of dollars a year in prize money and sponsorship deals, so choosing to live in a tax haven is a lucrative decision.”

However, as they note, taxation in professional tennis is pretty unique. Because players compete and earn money in tournaments all across the world, they are subject to many different countries’ tax laws. Players can be taxed both where they earn their money, and in their home countries, should they live there. Living in a place like Monaco therefore allows players to avoid being stung twice by taxation, meaning it’s an extremely desirable place to live.

Photo by VALERY HACHE/AFP via Getty Images

Daniil Medvedev and Stefanos Tsitsipas on living in Monaco

Well known tennis players who live in Monaco include: Novak Djokovic, Alexander Zverev, Matteo Berretini, Stanislas Wawrinka, Grigor Dimitrov, Feliz Auger Aliassime, Milos Raonic, and many more.

Daniil Medvedev and Stefanos Tsitsipas, who recently played each other in the semi finals of the Australian Open, also reside there. Despite being born and raised in Greece, Tsitsipas, along with his mother and father, moved to Monte Carlo in 2019.

“Big News. My family moved to the South of France and we are now living here in the South of France. I do not think that we will be back to Greece anytime soon. Maybe only for vacation,” the Greek tennis player said. He now lives in Monte-Carlo, just a 45-minute drive from the Patrick Mouratoglou Academy in Sophia Antipolis, in the South of France, where he trains.

Medvedev, who advanced to the 2022 Australian Open final, also made the move to Monaco from his native Russia. “I thought it would have been much better to live in Europe or United States than in Russia”, Medvedev said. Daniil Medvedev said it was hard to get used to in the beginning. However, he already spoke fluent French which helped him settle in.

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Joshua is a senior sports writer with over four years' experience in online writing. He graduated with a BA in Ancient History from The University of Manchester before receiving an MA in Sports Journalism from The University of Central Lancashire. He became a trending writer for a leading social publisher and later spent time covering the 2018 World Cup for The Mirror Online. He then moved to a social marketing agency where he acted as website editor. His specialties on The Focus include F1, tennis, NBA, NFL and combat sports.