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What is the meaning of Lil Durk's 'Leave them Broadway girls alone' song?

Bruno Cooke December 17, 2021
Lil Baby & Friends In Concert - Atlanta, GA

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After teasing a snippet via Instagram at the beginning of October, Morgan Wallen’s collaboration track with Lil Durk – country music meets hiphop – has landed. What is behind the lyric phrase, “Leave them Broadway girls alone”, and how have fans reacted to the track?

Country music meets hiphop – Broadway Girls has landed

28-year-old country music singer-songerwriter Morgan Wallen has teamed up with rapper Lil Durk – who is a year older – to release Broadway Girls. 

“Lil Durk is going places”, reads one of the top comments on the track’s YouTube video

Morgan Wallen previously teased part of the track via his Instagram page. The audio clip, posted on October 2 with the caption, “Idk what this is or what it’s for but sounds bout right”, has been listened to just over 1.5 million times.

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Photo by John Shearer/Getty Images for Ryman Auditorium

In the past few hours, it has picked up dozens more comments. Many particularly enjoy its invocation to “leave them Broadway girls alone” – one Instagram commenter has adapted it by changing “Broadway girls” to “valley girls”.

Broadway Girls melds the two distinct genres of hiphop and country music. It is a mix many of Wallen and Durk’s fans have received well.

Leave them Broadway girls alone lyrics explored

The chorus of Broadway Girls contains the following lyrics:

Now there’s two things that you’re gonna find out
They don’t love you and they only love you right now
If I was smarter I’d stayed my ass at home
And leave them Broadway girls alone

In particular, fans have latched onto the lyric, “Leave them Broadway girls alone” – it has captured the zeitgeist, with many pairing it with images from popular cartoons or memes.

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Broadway girls, Wallen sings, “don’t love you and they only love you right now”. Thus, it is better for people like him to “leave them Broadway girls alone”.

Lil Durk agrees: “Broadway girl’s a trap”; they try to “finesse” him; they “listen to Pink”. For the Chicago rapper, listening to Pink appears to be a red flag.

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How have people reacted to Morgan Wallen and Lil Durk’s collaboration track?

But beyond the significance of any particular lyric from Broadway Girls, the song appears to have unified musical demographics in a way many haven’t seen before. 

Country music and hiphop are both major parts of American culture, but don’t often necessarily mix. 

Twitter users have compared the fusion of country music and hiphop to the unification of opposing gang members; the appeasement of conservatives and liberals; and the relationship between Kevin Love and LeBron James.

By and large, the comments on the YouTube video are extremely positive. Fans have praised both artists for the collaboration, saying “we need a lot more” music that fuses country and hiphop.

One even wrote that they were “made for each other”.

By contrast, the popularity of Lil Nas X’s song Old Town Road, featuring country singer Billy Ray Cyrus, was “accompanied by confusion and outrage”, reads a Washington Post article on the track, from 2019. 

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Bruno is a novelist, amateur screenwriter and journalist with interests in digital media, storytelling, film and politics. He’s lived in France, China, Sri Lanka and the Philippines, but returned to the UK for a degree (and because of the pandemic) in 2020. His articles have appeared in Groundviews, Forge Press and The Friday Poem, and most are readable on Medium or onurbicycle.com.