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Crunchy White Pimp 4Ever meaning explained: Who was Brandon Baker?

Bruno Cooke January 10, 2022
crunchy white pimp 4ever meaning

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Brandon Baker was a Memphis rapper whose stage name, Crunchy White Pimp, has since transmogrified into a popular hashtag – on TikTok, on Twitter – the purpose of which is twofold: honour Brandon; “troll conservatives”. Who was Brandon Baker, and what’s the meaning of the Crunchy White Pimp 4Ever hashtag?

Who was Brandon Baker aka Crunchy White Pimp?

Born February 13, 1997, Brandon Scott Baker was a Memphis-based rapper and beat maker. 

He grew up in Bartlett, Tennessee – just outside Memphis – and started performing under the moniker Crunchy White Pimp as a teenager.

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Brandon died on June 10, 2019, at the age of 22. He is survived by his father, Greg, and two mothers, Candice Baker and Angelique Rodriguez; his siblings, Jessica Lynn Baker, Carley Elizabeth Baker, Paige Baker Brown, Bradley Upshaw, Aldo Santos, Jace Baker, and Britton Peel; and his young son, Carson Charles Baker.

“Not only has Carson inherited his dad’s good looks but also his sweet and easy personality,” reads Brandon’s obituary. Carson was 16 months old when his father died; his mother is Payton Lowry.

What is the meaning of the Crunchy White Pimp 4Ever hashtag from Elizabeth Houston’s TikTok video?

One of Brandon’s aunts, Elizabeth Houston (@bookersquared), posted a TikTok video on New Year’s Eve about her nephew Brandon Baker.

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The video starts with a clip of conservative commentator Ben Shapiro flexing his biceps and growling, “Let’s Go Brandon”.

“Let’s Go Brandon” has been a thing since a particularly consequential post-race interview with NASCAR racer Brandon Brown in October last year – Eve Edwards explains.

But for Elizabeth Houston, the chant has taken on a different meaning. Whenever she hears people chanting “Let’s Go Brandon”, she says in her TikTok video, she pictures them “rooting on Crunchy White Pimp at a show”.

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Source: YouTube [Official BOOKVR]

So how did #CrunchyWhitePimp4Ever come about, and why is it so popular?

To honour her nephew and, Daily Dot writes, “troll conservatives”, Houston asked people to respond to “Let’s Go Brandon” posts online with the hashtag, #CrunchyWhitePimp4Ever.

“It would be really cool if every time somebody says ‘Let’s Go Brandon’, somebody just replies with, ‘Crunchy White Pimp 4Ever’. … I would love to honour my nephew that way.”

Her video has been liked almost 250K times, and viewed almost a million.

The hashtag is also trending on Twitter and Reddit, although in a comparatively modest way.

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“When my sister got up to go to work, and saw just how the video took off,” Daily Dot quotes Houston as saying, “and the different things people are tagging #CrunchyWhitePimp4eva. It has made her so happy.”

Crunchy White Pimp merchandise – including T-shirts, hoodies and face masks – is available from Elizabeth Houston’s (aka BookerSquared’s) Bonfire online store. Proceeds from Crunchy White Pimp 4Ever T-shirt sales will support Brandon’s now-three-year-old son Carson.

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Bruno is a novelist, amateur screenwriter and journalist with interests in digital media, storytelling, film and politics. He’s lived in France, China, Sri Lanka and the Philippines, but returned to the UK for a degree (and because of the pandemic) in 2020. His articles have appeared in Groundviews, Forge Press and The Friday Poem, and most are readable on Medium or onurbicycle.com.