How much is Beat Saber on Oculus Quest 2? Price hike raises questions

Bruno Cooke July 27, 2022
How much is Beat Saber on Oculus Quest 2? Price hike raises questions
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Meta has announced that anyone who purchases a new Quest 2 from August through December will get Beat Saber absolutely free – how much is it usually?

NME reported today that Meta’s decision to dish out free copies of the virtual reality rhythm game represents an effort to “ease” the price hike of its Quest 2 headsets.

They’ll go up from $399.99 to $499.99 from August this year.

So, how much is Beat Saber on Oculus Quest 2 normally, and how much are you saving by getting it free with a bundle deal?

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How much is Beat Saber on Oculus Quest 2?

If you buy Beat Saber as a standalone purchase via the Oculus website, it will cost you $29.99.

You can also buy it as part of a bundle with an Imagine Dragons music pack for $39.99. It used to be $49.89.

Beat Saber supports Quest and Quest 2 headsets, as well as touch controllers. It requires an internet connection and 1.4 GB of space.

Oculus calls it a “unique VR rhythm game”. Your goal as a player is to “slash the beats”, thereby composing music of your own.

The Oculus Meta Quest 2, the virtual reality headset created by former Facebook Inc., being exhibited at the Qualcomm stand at Mobile World Congress (MWC) the biggest trade show of the sector focused on mobile devices, 5G, IOT, AI and big data, celebrated in Barcelona, on March 3, 2022 in Barcelona, Spain. (Photo by Joan Cros/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

How much is Beat Saber with a Quest 2 purchase?

Free! Although not quite yet.

Quest 2 buyers will get Beat Saber absolutely free if they purchase the headset new between 1 August 2022 and 31 December 2022.

Those who buy the headset need to activate the device before 31 January 2023. And they need to do so using an account that doesn’t already have Beat Saber enabled. Otherwise, they won’t be eligible to get their free copy of the software.

The offer comes, Upload VR notes, as Meta changes the base retail price of a Quest 2 headset from $299.99 to $399.99. The costs to make and ship their products, the outlet quotes Meta as saying in a statement, “have been on the rise”.

Photo by AMY OSBORNE/AFP via Getty Images

What is the difference between Meta Quest 2 and Oculus Quest 2?

There isn’t any difference between Meta Quest 2 and Oculus Quest 2.

The devices are the same, the only difference being the names. The Oculus Quest 2 became the Meta Quest 2 in November 2021. This happened as part of the rebranding of Facebook, Inc as Meta.

“Even with these pricing changes,” Oculus claimed in a release on its blog yesterday (26 July 2022), “Meta Quest 2 continues to be the most affordable VR headset with a comparable feature set on the market.”

“By adjusting the price of Quest 2, we can continue to grow our investment in groundbreaking research and new product development that pushes the VR industry to new heights.”

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Offering Beat Saber for free only partly makes up for the price hike

The new price of an Oculus (or Meta) Quest 2 will be $100 higher than it is now.

Meanwhile, Oculus is offering Beat Saber for free with purchases of a new Quest 2 headset. But Beat Saber only costs $29.99, meaning there is still an effective price increase of $70.01.

And for those who don’t have any interest in Beat Saber, and/or who wouldn’t have bought it otherwise, the bundle deal will not compensate for the price hike.

Beat Saber supports not only the Oculus Quest but also HTC Vive, PlayStation VR, and Valve Index. In other words, you don’t need a Quest (or Quest 2) to play it. You can look elsewhere if $399.99 is not within your means.

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Bruno is a novelist, amateur screenwriter and journalist with interests in digital media, storytelling, film and politics. He’s lived in France, China, Sri Lanka and the Philippines, but returned to the UK for a degree (and because of the pandemic) in 2020. His articles have appeared in Groundviews, Forge Press and The Friday Poem, and most are readable on Medium or onurbicycle.com.