Mystery photo of eerie deep-sea shark with protruding jaws caught on coast

Darcy Rafter September 29, 2022
Mystery photo of eerie deep-sea shark with protruding jaws caught on coast

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A creepy photo of a deep-sea shark with protruding teeth and large beady cartoon-like eyes has been caught by a Sydney-based fisherman off the coast of Australia.

This isn’t the first time that the Bermagui commercial fisherman, Jason “Trapman” Moyce, has gone viral for his catches. A couple of years ago, a video taken by Moyce, of four single-use plastic bags being pulled from the stomach of a tiger shark caused an emotional reaction. It led to a spur of petitions for a blanket ban on plastic bags in Australia, as per reports.

The photo of his most recent mystery discovery quickly went viral with people debating the species’ archaic appearance…

Creepy deep-sea shark with terrifying eyes caught off Sydney coast

Great White Shark lurking beneath the surface in dark water

On September 12, Facebook user and keen fisherman, Trapman Bermagui posted a snap of what he described as “the face of a deep sea rough skin shark”. It had been caught 650 meters underwater.

In a conversation with The Focus, Bermagui revealed the shark in the picture below was: “Caught in over 500m of water off the South East coast of Australia.”

He went on to explain the underwater sharks have a hefty weight of “about 50lb”. He added the “flesh is great for eating” and the livers are used for “cosmetic” purposes.

In the image, the shark is seen to have rough, speckled grey skin and a sharply pointed nose. The animal has large googly eyes and a protruding set of gnashers.

Trapman explained these sharks are commonly found in depths greater than 600 meters. Fisherman often catch them in wintertime.

The post has now gained 1,900 likes with users jesting “My, what big eyes you have, and those teeth”. Others stated it looks “sooo pre-historic.”

Others have commented it appears to be a cookie-cutter shark. However, Bermaugi hit back at these claims denying it was this species. Educating users with a picture of what a cookie-cutter mouth looks like, the knowledgeable fisherman explained the two sharks’ teeth are very different.

One user claimed the species to be an endeavor spur dog shark, which Bermaugi confirmed is another name for the underwater beasts.

Experts weigh in on ‘pre-historic’ deep-sea shark

Dean Grubbs, associate director of research at the Florida State University Coastal and Marine Laboratory, told Newsweek that the species appears to be “Centroscymnus owstoni” also known as the roughskin dogfish.

Grubbs explained: “In my deep-sea research, we have caught quite a few of them in the Gulf of Mexico and in the Bahamas.

“Ours have come from depths of 740 to 1160 meters (~2,400 to 3,800 feet), so a bit deeper than this report. They are in the family Somniosidae, the Sleeper Sharks, the same family of the Greenland Shark, but obviously a much smaller species.”

Christopher Lowe is a professor and director of the California State University Long Beach Shark Lab. Although, he had different thoughts on the species.

He said: “Looks to me like a deepwater kitefin shark, which are known in the waters off Australia.”

However, he notes it is hard to tell a species without knowing the size or weight of the animal.

Upon research, these sharks appear to prefer deeper waters of about 1,800 meters. They are often found in the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Oceans. However, it must be noted that different species of deepwater sharks are discovered fairly frequently.

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Darcy is an experienced journalist passionate about celebrity culture and entertainment. After gaining a degree in Media and Communications at Goldsmiths University she has also become a social media specialist, always keeping informed on the latest trends. With almost five years of experience in media, her expertise is analysing platforms such as Instagram, Twitter and TikTok. When she's not tracking the latest trending content, she’s watching films and eating lots of chocolate.