Comedian Jon Stewart, also known as “Stew Beef”, has finally joined Twitter, following the r/WallStreetBets–GameStop debacle.

Jon “Stew Beef” Stewart joins Twitter

Although Jon Stewart joined Twitter mere hours ago, already he has attracted over half a million followers (578.7K at the time of writing).

Stewart’s two tweets have amassed almost 450K Likes between them – it looks like he might just be the most popular new kid on the block.

And Twitter users are thrilled to see him join the microblogging platform.

He signed off his first tweet:

“Love
StewBeef”

What is the meaning of “Stew Beef”?

Jon Stewart earned the nickname “Stew Beef” in April 2010, when fellow comedian Tracy Morgan used it in an interview. It has since stuck – to the extent that diehard Jon Stewart fans were able to identify him on Twitter by his use of the name.

In 2018, Trevor Noah interviewed Tracy Morgan on The Daily Show to talk about the second season of The Last O.G. The name “Stew Beef” didn’t come up in their interview, however.

What is Jon Stewart tweeting about?

StewBeef took to Twitter to express his thoughts about yesterday’s GameStop furore.

Trading app Robinhood put blocks on trading after redditors, coordinating in the subreddit r/WallStreetBets, drove up the share price of electronics retail company GameStop, aiming to “turn the screw” on short-sellers.

The story has blown up over the last 36 hours, but the Financial Times caught it early, on 25 January. They noted that the share price of GameStop rocketed well beyond any previous figure.

stew beef jon stewart
NEW YORK – JUNE 17: The Late Show with Stephen Colbert and guest Jon Stewart during Monday’s June 17, 2019 show. (Photo by Scott Kowalchyk/CBS via Getty Images)

Jon Stewart’s friend Stephen Colbert added his voice to the conversation, saying now was a good time to “invest in whatever company makes the world’s tiniest violins”.

For many, the story contains more unknowns than knowns – financial sector jargon such as “short-selling”, “retail-driven squeeze” and “liquidity” can easily obfuscate the meaning for those who don’t regularly use the language.

There is an explanation circulating on Twitter which many have found helpful in making sense of the whole thing.

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