Ashton Kutcher says he's 'lucky to be alive' after rare disorder temporarily took his vision and hearing

Yasmine Leung August 9, 2022
Ashton Kutcher says he's 'lucky to be alive' after rare disorder temporarily took his vision and hearing
Photo by Robin L Marshall/Getty Images

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During a sneek peek of Running Wild With Bear Grylls, Ashton Kutcher revealed how a rare disorder “knocked out” his hearing and vision.

Ashton is the latest celebrity to brave the wilderness with survivalist Bear on Running Wild: The Challenge, during which the actor got candid about his major health scare a couple of years ago.

Photo by Mark Sagliocco/WireImage

Ashton Kutcher suffered hearing and sight impairment due to rare condition

The Two And A Half Men star discussed his health condition – which had remained a secret until now – for the first time.

“Two years ago I had this weird, super rare form of vasculitis that knocked out my vision. It knocked out my hearing, it knocked out all my equilibrium,” Kutcher reveals to Grylls as they wander through a maze of trees. “It took me about a year to build it all back up.”

“You don’t really appreciate it until it’s gone,” he continues. “Until you go, ‘I don’t know if I’m ever going to be able to see again, I don’t know if I’m ever going to be able to hear again, I don’t know if I’m ever going to be able to walk again.’ Lucky to be alive,” the actor admitted, which Grylls echoed.

Following the viral video Kutcher, who is married to Hollywood actress Mila Kunis, addressed the situation on his Twitter.

“Before there are a bunch of rumors/ chatter/ whatever out there. Yes, I had a rare vasculitis episode three years ago (autoimmune flare-up),” he wrote. “I had some impairments hear, vision, balance issues right after. I fully recovered. All good. Moving on.”

The That ’70s Show star has never been better and will participate in the 2022 New York City Marathon for his children’s charity, Thorn.

What is vasculitis?

Vasculitis is a rare autoimmune disorder that causes inflammation of the blood vessels, states the NHS.

Inflammation is the body’s natural reponse to infection or injury. In vasculitis, however, the immune system attacks healthy blood vessels, causing them to become narrow and swollen, thus restricting blood flow. If blood flow is restricted, it can lead to organ and tissue damage.

The condition may be triggered by medicine or infection, although the cause is often unknown.

Complications depend on the severity and type of condition, although they may include:

  • Blood clots and aneurysms
  • Organ damage
  • Infections – some medications used to treat vasculitis could weaken immune systems, making the body vulnerable to infections
  • Vision loss or blindness – most common in giant cell arteritis, which affects arteries in the head and neck. 
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Yasmine is a third-year Anthropology and Media student at Goldsmiths University with a new obsession with League of Legends, despite being really bad. She's always on social media keeping on top of the latest news and trends and is HITC’s expert in Korean pop culture. She also loves music, TV and fashion - her favourite things to write about.